See 3/14/16 Update

New York City Joint Remedial Process

Justice Ariel E. Belen (Ret.) was appointed by Judge Analisa Torres of the Southern District of District of New York in November 2014 to serve as the Facilitator to guide the Joint Remedial Process (“JRP”) described in the Remedies Opinion in Floyd v. City of New York, 959 F. Supp. 2d 668 (SDNY 2013). In this role, Justice Belen is conducting along with the parties and various stakeholders a civic engagement process to obtain input concerning proposed reforms to the stop and frisk and trespass arrest practices of the New York City Police Department (NYPD). The Remedies Opinion highlighted community input as a “vital part of a sustainable remedy in this case,” and placed the input of those communities “most affected by NYPD’s use of stop and frisk” at the “center of the Joint Remedial Process.” At the end of the process, Justice Belen will prepare a report with these recommendations for the consideration of the Monitor and Judge Torres. Under the Court’s order, these proposed remedial measures must be no broader than necessary to bring the NYPD’s use of stop and frisk and trespass arrests into compliance with the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments.

The Facilitation Team has had many meetings and discussions with different stakeholders as directed by the Remedies Opinion, including advocacy groups, community organizations, members of NYPD leadership, New York City government officials, Members of Congress, the District Attorneys, the Borough Presidents, the Speaker of the City Council, Members of the City Council, the Civilian Complaint Review Board management, police union leaders, minority police fraternal and advocacy organizations, religious leaders, and counsel for the parties. The Facilitation Team has also met with the plaintiffs in Floyd, Ligon and Davis.

As a result of these meetings and discussions, the Facilitation Team has determined that the best means of gathering input from interested stakeholders regarding meaningful reforms is, initially, through a series of structured focus group meetings – many of which will be done in conjunction with community groups – centered around questions developed in consultation with these groups and other stakeholders. The primary purpose of these focus groups is to obtain community input into reforms of the NYPD’s policies and practices relating to stop and frisk, housing trespass arrests and racial profiling.

After collecting data from the focus groups, the Facilitation Team plans to conduct leadership meetings and community forums around New York City. The forums will be structured and will be based, at least in large part, on the information gathered during the focus group and leadership meetings. Although the community forums will be geared primarily towards collecting community input about reforms, they may also serve as opportunities to develop dialogue between the NYPD and affected communities. The Facilitation Team will share the information gathered from the focus groups, leadership meetings and community forums with the stakeholders and the parties, seek their analysis and feedback, and finally prepare a report with recommendations for sustainable reforms to the Monitor and Judge Torres.

 

New York City Joint Remedial Process Update – 3/14/16

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In having determined that the best means of gathering input from interested stakeholders, the Facilitation Team has conducted 40 focus group meetings – done in conjunction with community organizations and groups – centered around questions developed in consultation with these groups and other stakeholders. The Facilitation Team is currently conducting focus groups with individuals who have had direct experiences with housing stops and trespass arrests. The primary purpose of these focus groups is to obtain community input into reforms of the NYPD’s policies and practices relating to stop, question and frisk, trespass enforcement and racial profiling.

The 40 focus groups conducted to date included 323 participants from the following collaborative organizations: Broome Street Academy, Covenant House, The Door, Streetwise & Safe, Safe Horizon, Cardinal Hayes High School, Cardinal Spellman High School, Brotherhood – SisterSol, Cure Violence SOS – Bronx, Cure Violence – SOS Far Rockaway, BronxConnect, The Fortune Society, Cure Violence SOS – East Flatbush, VOCAL-NY, Police Athletic League, Picture the Homeless, Man Up, Inc., Ali Forney Center, Malcolm X Grassroots, Exponents, Make the Road NY, and Central Family Life Center.

Figure 1: Focus group participants were between the ages of 14 and 80.

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Figure 2: Focus group participants self-identified as belonging to the following gender categories.

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Figure 3: Focus group participants self identified as belonging to the following racial categories. The following racial categories were consistent with the NYPD Stop, Question, Frisk (SQF) data, except for the multi-racial category.

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After collecting data from the focus groups, the Facilitation Team plans to conduct leadership meetings and community forums around New York City. The forums will be structured and will be based, at least in large part, on the information gathered during the focus group and leadership meetings. Although the community forums will be geared primarily towards collecting community input about reforms, they may also serve as opportunities to develop dialogue between the NYPD and affected communities. The Facilitation Team will share the information gathered from the focus groups, leadership meetings and community forums with the stakeholders and the parties, seek their analysis and feedback, and finally prepare a report with recommendations for sustainable reforms to the Monitor and Judge Torres.